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Which Fishing Line To Use?


The line used for boat fishing falls into
three categories. Monofilament is
nylon line ( mono as it’s more widely
known ) then there are fluorocarbons and
braids.

You may find that die-hard boat
anglers will have three or four reels
loaded up with different breaking strains
of both mono and braid so they can
instantly react to a change of mark or sea
conditions.



Monofilament (Mono)

The most widely used fishing line is mono and it is also the cheapest. Large bulk spools costing very little are used to fill up reels for uptiding and
shallow water fishing. The big difference between mono and braid is its
stretch. Mono will stretch considerably making bites less detectable (
feeling the bottom in deep water much more difficult. On the
positive side the stretch does iron out a few problerr
for the beginner. As the bites are less obvious
there is not the tendency to strike too before the fish has the hook in it’s mouth. When playing
a hard-fighting fish the stretch in mono
can soften any violent that could free the hook – as can often
happen when using braid.
If you fish a shallow area like the Thames Estuary
and are casting uptide you can either fish with a slightly heavier mono
right through, such as 20lb or 15lb main line with a heavier
mono leader of about 30lb. This second option makes casting safer and
also helps controlling the fish when it gets near the boat. The only time
this method suffers is when there is lots of weed about, as it will
accumulate on the leader knot.

boat fishing line

Braid

Modern developments in manufacturing
processes have seen braided lines become
ever thinner, to the point where for
the same strength you can get braid that
is around 50 per cent less in diameter to the
same strength mono. This gives it a few advantages
over nylon mono. Most importantly, it creates less
resistance allowing less weight to be used, making it
an altogether lighter and more pleasurable experience to use. Braid has
almost no stretch so every bump and
bite is felt as it’s transferred directly to the hands of the angler
Small bites can be so violent there is a tendency to strike
early mssing the fish, so rods used with braid lines should have
a soft tip to counter this.
Because braid is expensive, compared to the bulk spools of
mono, it is a good idea to half fill your reel with mono then add a couple
of hundred metres/yards of braid on top. Being so thin it won’t take up much reel
space. If you get in a tangle with other anglers, braid is a nightmare to untangle si it may be best left to experienced anglers.


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